Compile logo parse: compile

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If you're going to be running the same format string over many inputs it will make sense to compile the format first. This makes the code cleaner, but it may also cause a performance boost.

from parse import compile

p = compile("https://github.com/{account}/{project}/")

txt = "https://github.com/koaning/scikit-lego/"
p.parse(txt)

txt = "foo https://github.com/koaning/scikit-lego/"
p.search(txt)

txt = "https://github.com/koaning/scikit-lego/ https://github.com/koaning/scikit-lego/"
p.findall(txt)

Important

In this series of videos we've been exploring parse by using it to parse urls. If you're really only dealing with URLs you may want to explore yarl. It's a tool that's specialized to that task. The goal of parse is to be a general tool for strings in python. Not just URLs.

Much in the same fashion, if you're dealing with dates you'll likely want to check out datefinder.